Auto Insurance Tips for Seniors; What You Need to Know

September 4, 2008.

Life zips by, suddenly people who never thought they would get old are looking at changes in their lives and how they drive, says Frank N. Darras, the nation's leading disability and Long-Term Care insurance lawyer. With times changing so are the regulations for renewing drivers licenses.

We are all living longer, becoming grandparents later in life and working a lot more years. We love our cars, the independence they give us and it is important to keep driving for as long as we can, says Darras. See http://www.darrasnews.com/.

"Across the country, the Divisions of Motor Vehicles are making the rules stricter for aging drivers. Often renewals must be made in person, which is stressful and time consuming," says Darras. "What is a person in her 60's or 70's to do when she feels and looks healthy, but worries about the DMV denying her the privilege to drive?"

Darras makes these suggestions:

  • One of the best things seniors can do is take a mature driver safety course. This can ensure that you continue to drive safely and should help keep insurance rates low.
  • Consider the vehicle you drive; features should include easily adjustable seats, light weight doors, unrestricted visibility, easy to reach seatbelts and shoulder harnesses, clear display panels, windows and an easy to read dashboard.
  • Get checkups to make sure your health or medication is not affecting your ability to drive.
  • If you are not comfortable driving during rush hour or after dusk, don't.
  • Communicate openly with family members and friends, get them to drive you when the weather is bad or you are not comfortable driving.

Your health will impact your driving. If you have falling episodes, diabetes, early stages of dementia, vision, foot or swelling problems, your doctor may be able to offer some solutions. He may suggest physical therapy or strength and flexibility training that can help. He/she also may recommend that you evaluate your situation, the safety of yourself and others and discuss alternate means of transportation.

Be open to the changes you are facing and find ways to ensure a life time of independence, whether it means driving yourself or enlisting friends, loved ones and community services to help you.